Tips for getting pregnant – Conceive Plus Singapore
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Tips for getting pregnant

Little steps for little steps

The time to start working towards a healthy pregnancy is before you conceive.

Stop taking birth control

If you are currently taking birth control, you will need to stop. If you are using barrier methods, such as condoms, diaphragms, a cervical cap or sponge, you should simply remove and/or stop using them. With hormonal contraception, such as the pill, it’s best to consult your doctor. Generally, you should allow 2–3 months for your body to adjust to regular periods before trying.

If you are using an IUD (intrauterine contraceptive device), this should be removed one cycle prior to trying while a hormonal implant or injection can last 3–6 months. Most commercial lubricants have been shown to be harmful to sperm. So if you are using a lubricant during intercourse due to dryness, discontinue and start using Conceive Plus®.

 

Cut back on partying

Drinking and smoking during pregnancy? We don’t need to tell you they’re both major don’ts. If you indulge in either, start scaling back now. 

 

Limit caffeine intake

If your local barista knows your order as soon as you step up to the counter, then it’s time to cut back your caffeine intake now.

 

Start taking multi-vitamins

Preferably ones containing at least 400 micrograms of folic acid. Talk to your doctor/pharmacist to find one that suits you best.

 

Get some sleep

Studies show that women who get too little sleep tend to have more problems ovulating regularly than those who don’t.

 

Find your stress antidote

Research shows that having high stress levels can delay your ability to get pregnant. Develop some strategies for dealing with stress – maybe a cup of tea, walking through the park or cuddling up with an old film. Whatever it is, if it works for you now, it will help you when you’re pregnant.

 

Talk to your mum, sisters, aunts and gran 

Ask them lots of questions: Did it take them a long tim to conceive? Were there any complications? Some health conditions tend to run in families, and it’s a good idea to know your history and share any relevant information with your doctor. But don't worry too much. Just because it took your sister a year to get pregnant doesn’t mean you’ll necessarily have a hard time too. 

Many common fertility problems, like poor egg quality (due to age) or blocked fallopian tubes, are not hereditary. But some, like fibroids or ovarian cysts, can be. Your doctor can help you understand which, if any, issues can affect your fertility so you’ll be better prepared to deal with them later.

 

Be prepared

If you’re planning to become pregnant, prepare for a healthy pregnancy by taking care of medical and dental concerns beforehand.

 

Stop buying clothes

You’ll grow out of those fitted tops and skinny jeans within a couple of months.

 

Step on the scale

If you can stand to shed a few pounds, now is the time to go for it!

 

Develop a maternity and baby budget

Draw up a checklist to estimate how much you are going to spend on the new arrival.